Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Elderly Woman Looks Out WindowDementia affects millions of individuals throughout the world, with Alzheimer’s disease identified as a leading cause. This progressive disorder causes degeneration of brain cells which can lead to cognitive decline. Spotting the early symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease is important so diagnosis and treatment can begin as soon as possible and you can determine the best care options for your family. If you suspect that a loved one is developing dementia, Serenity Home Care addresses the most common early Alzheimer’s symptoms and dementia warning signs to understand when help is required.

Memory Loss

Memory loss is the most notable characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. This loss of ability can show itself in a variety of ways, such as:

  • Forgetting routine information, including dates or names, that the person should know
  • Asking the same questions repeatedly
  • Frequently misplacing common items and finding them in odd places
  • Not being able to think of the correct word when speaking in conversation
  • Getting lost in familiar places

Some of these symptoms are natural signs of aging rather than a cause for concern. However, a doctor should be consulted when these problems become more persistent or disrupt everyday life.

Problem-Solving Skills

Diminished ability to reason and think critically is another significant warning sign for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Abstract concepts, such as numbers or money, can become more difficult, making everyday tasks like paying bills or making purchases at the grocery store a struggle. You may also notice that a spouse or family member takes longer than normal to complete tasks that were once easy or that they can’t concentrate on a topic as long as they once could.

These situations often lead to frustration in individuals showing early Alzheimer’s symptoms, and it’s important to address their feelings with respect, empathy, and kind offers of help. At the same time, treatment and care planning are needed before these issues extend too far and living independently becomes untenable.

Changes in Personality

The shifting composition of the brain caused by dementia can also cause behavioral changes that are out of the ordinary. Affected individuals may experience abrupt and even extreme mood swings that leave them easily upset or irritated with little warning. When combined with other symptoms, these mood swings often lead people with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease to withdraw socially due to embarrassment and frustration. If you notice a loved one shying away from conversation, avoiding social gatherings, or abandoning favorite activities, early Alzheimer’s symptoms could be to blame.

Impaired Judgment

Diminished ability to make rational decisions is another common sign of cognitive decline and dementia. A person with impaired judgment may act out of character or say things that are inappropriate for the occasion. Additionally, individuals with Alzheimer’s disease may stop taking care of themselves, neglecting grooming, and proper clothing. These impairments are dangerous in many ways, from failing to wear a winter coat in cold weather to struggling with safe driving. Without appropriate support and supervision, it can be difficult to ensure a person with dementia can remain safely at home.

Home Care that Makes a Difference

If you notice any of these early Alzheimer’s symptoms, it’s important to have a candid, caring discussion with your loved one and other family members. When they prefer to remain in the home they love, in-home care services can ensure they are safe, comfortable, and engaged for the family’s peace of mind. To learn more about home care for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, contact us online or call 503-520-9400 to speak with a member of our team.

Contact Us

Serenity Home Care
Serenity Home Care
12725 SW Millikan Way, Ste 300, Beaverton, OR 97005
Phone: 503-520-9400503-520-9400 | After Hours Phone: 503-740-2212503-740-2212 | Fax: 503-520-9401
Business Hours: Monday to Friday: 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Saturday and Sunday: By appointment

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